First Light at National Council for the Social Studies Conference
Dec
2
10:00 am10:00

First Light at National Council for the Social Studies Conference

  • Walter E. Washington Convention Center (Room 145B)

(Registration Required)

Examining a Historic Truth and Reconciliation Commission in the U.S.: Can Teachers Change Attitudes and Discourse about Native Peoples?

Discover how to teach the story of the unprecedented Truth and Reconciliation Commission on forced removal of Native children with a new documentary and its teaching resources, including a free film and curriculum.

Presenters: 

Mishy Lesser, Upstander Project, Watertown, MA; Adam Mazo, Upstander Project, Boston, MA

(Room 145B)

First Light at the National Council for the Social Studies Conference
Dec
1
2:00 pm14:00

First Light at the National Council for the Social Studies Conference

  • Walter E. Washington Convention Center (Room 149B)

(Registration Required)

Cultural Genocide against Native Peoples in the U.S.: Findings from a Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Unprecedented truth and reconciliation commission on forced removal of Native children explored in film and related curricula. Was it cultural genocide? Learn to teach this story. Free film and curriculum.
Fee: $20 for members, $35 for nonmembers

Presenters: 

Mishy Lesser, Upstander Project, Watertown, MA; Adam Mazo, Upstander Project, Boston, MA; Nikki Ulrich, Close Up Foundation, Alexandria, VA; S.D. Nelson, author and illustrator, member of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe

For more information on our Friday, December 2nd workshop visit here: http://www.socialstudies.org/conference/session/examining-historic-truth-and-reconciliation-commission-us-can-teachers-change

First Light at SPACE Portland
Nov
20
7:00 pm19:00

First Light at SPACE Portland

  • SPACE Gallery

Conversation with filmmakers and participants: http://www.space538.org/events/first-light-inside-maines-historic-truth-and-reconciliation-commission

Coexist airs on WORLD Channel across the US
Oct
23
Oct 24

Coexist airs on WORLD Channel across the US

Our film Coexist airs on WORLD Channel starting Sunday night October 23rd at 11pm (EDT) and throughout the following week.

Check your local listings for availability in your area: http://worldchannel.org/programs/episode/coexist/

Additional airdates:

Monday Oct. 24th, 3am and 11am
Tuesday Oct. 25, 6pm
Saturday Oct. 29, 1pm

First Light at Harvard Graduate School of Education
Oct
17
12:00 pm12:00

First Light at Harvard Graduate School of Education

  • Harvard Graduate School of Education

The View from the Boat and the View from the Shore: Native peoples and Truth and Reconciliation in New England

During this interactive presentation by the founders of Upstander Project, Dr. Mishy Lesser and Mr. Adam Mazo, participants will watch First Light and discuss the relationship between dispossession of Native land and the forced removal of Native children, and the lessons learned from the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Participants will also examine Upstander Project’s online resources about Indian Boarding Schools and forced assimilation of Native children, and discuss how they might adapt them to the classroom. 

Open to the public

First Light at the Abbe Museum
May
3
8:00 pm20:00

First Light at the Abbe Museum

  • Abbe Museum

All are welcome for this free screening of First Light. This event includes a conversation with First Light co-director/producer Adam Mazo and members of the Abbe museum team including Museum Educator George Neptune.

Upstander Project at the New England Regional Council for the Social Studies Conference
Apr
4
8:30 am08:30

Upstander Project at the New England Regional Council for the Social Studies Conference

  • Sturbridge Host Hotel - Abbington

(Registration required) Can Social Studies Teachers Help Change the Narrative about Native Peoples in New England?

This session uses original documentary film and learning resources designed with and for teachers to explore the historical context of the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), which recently concluded two years of research documenting the forced removal of Wabanaki children from their families and tribes. The TRC’s final report frames this practice of forced assimilation as evidence of cultural genocide.

Presenters: Dr. Mishy Lesser and Adam Mazo, Upstander Project, Jacob Skrzypiec, Manchester High School, CT and Jennifer McMunn, Manchester Middle School, Storrs, CT

Can Teachers Change the Narrative around Native peoples in the U.S.?
Apr
1
8:45 am08:45

Can Teachers Change the Narrative around Native peoples in the U.S.?

  • Hilton Hotel - Empire A

(Registration Required)

This session is part of the New York State Council for the Social Studies' 78th Annual Convention. 

This session uses compelling documentary and related learning resources to explore the historical context of Maine’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which focused on forcible removal of Wabanaki children by the state. The TRC’s final report frames child removal as evidence of ongoing cultural genocide. After screening First Light, we use primary sources to apply the inquiry process as we explore genocide in United States. Participants learn about Listening Circles and interrogate testimony from those featured in the film. Join a community of teachers who are using human rights and genocide education to strengthen the social emotional competencies of their students. 

Presenters: Dr. Mishy Lesser and Adam Mazo, Upstander Project

First Light at Harvard Graduate School of Education
Jan
29
12:00 pm12:00

First Light at Harvard Graduate School of Education

  • Harvard Gutman Conference Center A3

Upstander Project helps bystanders become upstanders through compelling documentary films and related learning resources.UP shines a spotlight on unexamined social history to challenge indifference to injustice, develop the skills of upstanders, and contribute to action-oriented campaigns.

The second film, First Light, exposes how generations of Native children have been forcibly removed from their families and culture, and asks: How does a culture survive the taking of its children? First Light is anchored by the feature film, Dawnland, which tells the story of the historic Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the first of its kind in the United States. Dawnland will be released in early 2017.

During this interactive presentation by the founders of Upstander Project, Dr. Mishy Lesser and Mr. Adam Mazo, participants will watch First Light and discuss the relationship between dispossession of Native land and the forced removal of Native children.

First Light at the National Council for Social Studies Conference
Nov
15
8:00 am08:00

First Light at the National Council for Social Studies Conference

  • Convention Center

Can Teachers Change the Narrative around Native Americans?

Registration required

A historic truth and reconciliation commission on forced removal of Native American children is explored in a new documentary. Learn how to teach this story. Free film and curriculum.

Presenters: 
Mishy Lesser, Upstander Project, Boston, MA; Adam Mazo, Upstander Project, Boston, MA

 

First Light on MPBN
Nov
14
11:00 am11:00

First Light on MPBN

First Light will air on Maine Public Broadcasting Network TV across Maine on Saturday, November 14th at 11am. Check your local listings here: http://www.mpbn.net/Television/TVSchedule.aspx

First Light on MPBN
Nov
12
10:00 pm22:00

First Light on MPBN

First Light will air on Maine Public Broadcasting Network TV across Maine on Thursday, November 12th at 10pm and again on Saturday, November 14th at 11am. Check your local listings here: http://www.mpbn.net/Television/TVSchedule.aspx

First Light at Massachusetts Council for the Social Studies
Oct
28
2:20 pm14:20

First Light at Massachusetts Council for the Social Studies

(Registration Required)

Truth and Reconciliation: Can teachers change the narrative around Native Americans in New England?

This session uses original documentary film and curriculum to explore the historical context of the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which recently concluded two years of research documenting the forced removal of Wabanaki children from their families and tribes. The TRC’s final report declares this practice of forced assimilation to be cultural genocide. We will screen our new short documentary, First Light, and use the inquiry process to develop compelling questions about genocide in New England’s history and consider ways of taking informed action in contemporary reality. This interactive workshop will introduce participants to Question Formulation Technique and Listening Circles, as well as related online learning materials. The session is a preview of the Upstander Academy Summer Institute for Teachers, to be held at UConn’s Dodd Center in July 2016. 

Coexist at Massachusetts Council for the Social Studies
Oct
28
12:40 pm12:40

Coexist at Massachusetts Council for the Social Studies

  • Holiday Inn & Suites Marlborough

(Registration Required)

Genocide Education and Restorative Practices in Schools

The central objective of this workshop is to introduce participants to the factors that contributed to genocide in Rwanda and explore the cost of "us-them" thinking to develop a culture of respect in their schools.
Using the award-winning documentary film, Coexist, and its four-lesson Teacher’s Guide, middle and high school educators will:
1.     Develop a deeper understanding of factors that contributed to the Rwanda genocide

2.     Have greater clarity about the concepts of forgiveness and reconciliation as they relate to post-genocidal society

3.     Learn how to use the case of genocide in Rwanda to examine othering and encourage upstander behavior in their schools

4.     Get ideas for interdisciplinary lessons, resources, and strategies

5.     Experience new practices to engage students in small/large group discussion.

Across Massachusetts there are frequent reports of discrimination and acts of brutality that impact students’ ability to learn and flourish. No school or community is immune. The dimensions of the problem are colossal and what is at stake for our society is the growing pain and trauma of targeted individuals and groups, and the spreading of violence. We aim to address these by bringing the stories of victims and perpetrators of the Rwanda genocide to students and teachers so they can sharpen their own moral reasoning about how to engage with one another respectfully, and how to treat and protect one another from harm. This approach promotes the teaching of social studies as an inquiry arc to encourage student curiosity, and the application of history tools and concepts, gathering and evaluating of sources, and communication of conclusions for the purpose of taking action.
All workshop participants will receive a copy of the Coexist DVD and a link to the PDF of the Coexist Teacher’s Guide—a comprehensive curriculum for teaching about colonialism, genocide, reconciliation, and social emotional skills for dealing with difference and contributing to an upstander culture at their school.

First Light at Connecticut Council for the Social Studies
Oct
27
2:05 pm14:05

First Light at Connecticut Council for the Social Studies

  • Crowne Plaza Hotel

(Registration Required)

Truth and Reconciliation: Can Teachers Change the Narrative around Native Americans in New England?

This session uses original documentary film and curriculum to explore the historical context of the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which recently concluded two years of research documenting the forced removal of Wabanaki children from their families and tribes. The TRC’s final report declares this practice of forced assimilation to be cultural genocide. We will screen the new short documentary, Children of the Dawn, and use the inquiry process to develop compelling questions about genocide in New England’s history and consider ways of taking informed action in contemporary reality. This interactive workshop will introduce participants to Question Formulation Technique and Listening Circles, as well as related online learning materials. The session is a preview of the Upstander Academy Summer Institute for Teachers, to be held at UConn’s Dodd Center in July 2016.

Presenters: Dr.Mishy Lesser, Learning Director, Upstander Project; Jennifer McMunn, Mansfield Public Schools; Glenn Mitoma, Director, Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut; Jacob Skrzypiec, Manchester Public Schools
Target Audience: 5-12